Zoetrope: All-Story
Historic Zoetrope Building
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    Zoetrope: All-Story is Francis Ford Coppola’s internationally acclaimed fiction and art magazine.  
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    Zoetrope: All-Story is Francis Ford Coppola’s internationally acclaimed fiction and art magazine.  
  • Subscribe to all-story
    Zoetrope: All-Story is Francis Ford Coppola’s internationally acclaimed fiction and art magazine.  

CURRENT EDITION

Guest Designer

Sylvia Plachy

Contributors

Sylvia Plachy
’Pemi Aguda
Jim Shepard
Ariel Dorfman
Haruki Murakami
Jack Gain

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NEWS & EVENTS

News and Events

Short Fiction Competition

Many thanks to all who entered the 2021 Short Fiction Competition. We appreciate the opportunity to read such bright and brilliant new work.

From nearly 2,000 submissions, guest judge and 2021 Pulitzer Prize finalist Daniel Mason honored the following stories . . .

Winter 2021/2022 Edition

The editors are thrilled to announce the release of the Winter 2021/2022 Edition, designed by the acclaimed photographer Sylvia Plachy, with contributions from National Magazine Award finalist ’Pemi Aguda, National Book Award finalist Jim Shepard, and Tanizaki Prize–winner Haruki Murakami, among others.

Five Questions with Sylvia Plachy

Why did you accept the invitation to design the Winter 2021/2022 edition of All-Story?
You called at the right time—if you had called half an hour earlier or later . . . I don’t know. The timing was right: I needed a shorter, smaller project. 

Any challenges?
The biggest challenge was to arrange . . .

FROM THE ARCHIVE

Story artwork by guest designer Olafur  Eliasson

Seeing Diane Arbus
Lindsay Zibach

As a special online supplement to the Winter 2016/2017 issue, the editors present the prizewinning story from the 2016 Zoetrope: All–Story Short Fiction Competition, as judged by Anthony Marra.

Back then, as I began to suffer more and more from bouts of inexplicable insomnia, I often found myself sitting at three or four in the morning in the corner booth of a Hell’s Kitchen dive bar just above the subway line on Eighth, hoping that I couldn’t be seen. It wasn’t that the staff let me stay past closing, it was that they weren’t used to looking for a woman who was hardly tall enough to see over the table.
     This wasn’t the kind of bar for meeting friends—you went there so you wouldn’t have to meet anyone at all. The way the patrons bowed their heads when a new person walked in, you’d think it was a church. The glasses were stained with layers of old lipstick . . .

PAST EDITIONS

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