Zoetrope: All-Story
Historic Zoetrope Building
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    Zoetrope: All-Story is Francis Ford Coppola’s internationally acclaimed fiction and art magazine.  
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    Zoetrope: All-Story is Francis Ford Coppola’s internationally acclaimed fiction and art magazine.  
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    Zoetrope: All-Story is Francis Ford Coppola’s internationally acclaimed fiction and art magazine.  

CURRENT EDITION

Guest Designer

Juman Malouf

Contributors

Jamil Jan Kochai
Stuart Dybek
Wes Anderson
Hanan Al-Shaykh

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NEWS & EVENTS

News and Events

Short Fiction Competition

Many thanks to all who entered the 2021 Short Fiction Competition. We appreciate the opportunity to read such bright and brilliant new work.

From nearly 2,000 submissions, guest judge and 2021 Pulitzer Prize finalist Daniel Mason honored the following stories . . .

Spring 2022 Edition

The editors are thrilled to announce the release of the Spring 2022 edition, designed by the acclaimed illustrator and costume and set designer Juman Malouf, with contributions from Oscar-nominated filmmaker Wes Anderson, MacArthur fellow Stuart Dybek, and PEN/Hemingway Award finalist Jamil Jan Kochai, among others.

Five Questions with Juman Malouf

Why did you accept the invitation to design the Spring 2022 edition of All-Story?
Zoetrope: All-Story is the only magazine I still receive in the mail! I always enjoy the stories—but, also, I love seeing how the designers completely reinvent each issue, which is always unexpected and wildly different from the last. I wanted a shot at it.

FROM THE ARCHIVE

Story artwork by guest designer Jim Jarmusch

Two Beautiful Anachronisms
Jim Jarmusch

POLAROIDS
Like so many of us who have worked in visual/photographic forms, I’ve always loved Polaroids. Imagine, in the predigital world in which I evolved, the idea of near-instant, self-developing photographs, each a singular, original print! Fantastic. I still own my early 1970s automatic Model 350 Land Camera with collapsible bellows, and my sleek, silver and brown, perfectly designed SX-70—both of which can fold nearly flat to slip into a coat pocket or briefcase, both truly beautiful objects.


And then, of course, there’s that very distinct quality specific to Polaroid photographs—a slightly softened, slightly subdued, dreamlike thing. The color Polaroids are often on the cool side, a little desaturated, while the black-and-whites seem to have a contrast and liquidity I can’t quite describe.


I remember watching Robby Müller pulling the prints from his camera an . . .

PAST EDITIONS

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