Zoetrope: All-Story
Historic Zoetrope Building
  • Current Issue Cover
    Zoetrope: All-Story is Francis Ford Coppola’s internationally acclaimed fiction and art magazine.  
  • Past Issue Cover
    Zoetrope: All-Story is Francis Ford Coppola’s internationally acclaimed fiction and art magazine.  
  • Subscribe to all-story
    Zoetrope: All-Story is Francis Ford Coppola’s internationally acclaimed fiction and art magazine.  

CURRENT EDITION

Guest Designer

Juman Malouf

Contributors

Jamil Jan Kochai
Stuart Dybek
Wes Anderson
Hanan Al-Shaykh

Buy

NEWS & EVENTS

News and Events

Short Fiction Competition

Many thanks to all who entered the 2021 Short Fiction Competition. We appreciate the opportunity to read such bright and brilliant new work.

From nearly 2,000 submissions, guest judge and 2021 Pulitzer Prize finalist Daniel Mason honored the following stories . . .

Spring 2022 Edition

The editors are thrilled to announce the release of the Spring 2022 edition, designed by the acclaimed illustrator and costume and set designer Juman Malouf, with contributions from Oscar-nominated filmmaker Wes Anderson, MacArthur fellow Stuart Dybek, and PEN/Hemingway Award finalist Jamil Jan Kochai, among others.

Five Questions with Juman Malouf

Why did you accept the invitation to design the Spring 2022 edition of All-Story?
Zoetrope: All-Story is the only magazine I still receive in the mail! I always enjoy the stories—but, also, I love seeing how the designers completely reinvent each issue, which is always unexpected and wildly different from the last. I wanted a shot at it.

FROM THE ARCHIVE

Story artwork by guest designer David Lynch

Teeth
Miles Greaves

As a special online supplement to the Winter 2018/2019 issue, the editors present the prizewinning story from the 2018 Zoetrope: All-Story Short Fiction Competition, as judged by Colum McCann.

To get to work I had to cross the mouth of an alley, and as it neared me my armpits would pucker, because every day—out of the vibrating, leftmost limit of my leftmost eye—I would see a woman standing there, staring out of the alley, across the street, at a window in an opposing apartment building. The woman stared so energetically that crossing the line of her vision was like crossing the beam of a hose, and I would feel its pressure run along the length of my cheek, like a grandmother’s finger. The woman also stood, always, up to her ankles in a butter-colored puddle, and if a camera had grown out of my left ear, and if it had taken one photo of that woman each day as I passed, and if we had fanned those Polaroids out over a . . .

PAST EDITIONS

Subscribe to All-Story
Subscribe to All-Story